12.26.2009

Fair and Fair Alike: Miami 2009. Working the Angles

Fair and Fair Alike coverage so far:

ABMB: Stanley Whitney at Team Gallery, New York
.

I've often said that in my next life I plan to come back as a curator (in a large museum where there's pay and institutional support, thank you). In the meantime, I get to indulge my curatorial urges with posts like these. One of the great things about curating blog-style is that it allows for a nicely non-hierarchical coming together of artists and galleries. .

Art Miami: Charles Arnoldi, Eckert Fine Art, Kent, Conn.
.

ABMB: Gerhard Richter, Quattro Colori series, at Marian Goodman, New York
.

ABMB: Peter Halley, Cross Currents, at Mary Boone Gallery, New York
.

ABMB: Poul Gernes, Untitled, Galeri Bo Bjerggaar, Copenhagen
.

ABMB: Robert Mangold, Split Image, at Pace Wildenstein, New York

.
Pulse: Shirley Kaneda and David Ryan, at Galerie Jean-Luc & Takako Richard, Paris
.
Below, detail of work by Ryan
.
.

ABMB: Steven Aalders; at Slewe Galerie, Amsterdam
.

ABMB: Paulo Pasta, Galleria Millian, Sao Paolo
.

ABMB: Harvey Quaytman, Recidivist, at McKee Gallery, New York
.

NADA: Michael Rey, at Karyn Lovegrove Gallery, Los Angeles
..

ABMB: Victor Vasareley, Axo, 1974, at Galerie Daniel Templon, Paris
.

Pulse: Linda Besemer, at Galerie Jean-Luc & Takako Richard, Paris
.
Installation view below
with another closeup below that

.
.
.

ABMB: Sarah Morris, Portuguese Bowline, at Capitan Petzel Gallery, Paris and New York
.

ABMB: Thomas Nozkowski, Untitled (8-116), 2009, at Stephen Friedman Gallery, London
.

Pulse: Jeff Kellar,Wall Drawing, at Richard Levy Gallery, Albuquerque
.

ABMB: Daniel Buren, Emerging Cubes, at Lisson Gallery, London
.

NADA: Ben Berlow's tiny geometries on book pages, at Jack Hanley Gallery, San Francisco
.
Below, closeup of one
.
.

ABMB: Anne Truitt, acrylic on paper, 1969, at Matthew Marks, New York
.

Pulse: Patrick Wilson, at Marx & Zavattero, San Francisco
.

Pulse: Robert Courtwright, untitled collage construction, at Pavel Zoubok, New York
.

ABMB: Mira Schendel gouaches, installed in the Art Kabinett at Galeria Millian, Sao Paolo
.

ABMB: Al Taylor, acrylic paintings on newsprint, 1985, at David Zwirner Gallery, New York .

ABMB: Susana Solano, La Imaginacion III, at McKee Gallery, New York
.

Pulse: Siemens Art Lab, Vienna
. .

Red Dot: George Dunbar, at Myers Contemporary, Annapolis
.

NADA: Eva Berendes silk square, at Jacky Strunz Gallery, Berlin
.

NADA: Sarah Crowner, pieced paintings, at Nicelle Beauchene, New York
.


ABMB: John McLaughlin, V-1958, 1958, oil on canvas, at Greenberg Van Doren, New York
.

ABMB: Heimo Zobering, installation wall from Galleries Nagel Grasslin
.

ABMB: Esther Stocker installation, at Galerie Krobath, Vienna
.
.
Next post: Blanc et Noir, mostly geometry in an achromatic palette
.
Want to see more? There are two important and expansive online resources for abstraction of the geometric and reductive kind: Geoform and Minus Space. While there's some visual overlap, Geoform has the more expansive vision, Minus Space the more stringently reductive; both are international in scope. Each online project is founded and maintained by artists who are passionate about this particular aspect of artistic expression.

10 comments:

lisa said...

Thanks, Joanne
Great post!

Stephanie Sachs said...

Thanks for posting the Nozkowski painting in the last two posts. It was one of the most memorable paints to me and I did not have a picture. Watched a wonderful short video on youtube of his son interviewing him on a walk. It made me see everything in a new light.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nxi82Ne9yxQ

Happiest and healthiest of New Years to you Joanne.

Tamar said...

Thank you, Joanne for this wonderful series on the Miami Fairs. You've given us a wonderfully curated tour. My faves from this post: the above mentioned Nozkowski, Charles Arnoldi and the Ben Berlow pieces.

zackofalltrades said...

nice post, lots of great work and I wish I had noticed those truitts at the time (sad face) - no offense but, what's really interesting about this (for me, now) is the way photography levels the images, so that a peter halley (assaultive) more resembles a sarah morris (hard and shiny) more resembles a john mclaughlin (dry and subtle) than they actually do in life - just goes to show, photography and the internet are wonderful tools but ain't nothin like the real thing, and thank goodness for that !!!

Joanne Mattera said...

Zack,

Add to that the fact that everyone's monitor is different, so the colors are different as well. But then, isn't this how we all learned art history? With badly printed images in art books --early on, many of them in b/w--and via slides that were losing their color from so many times in front of the bright projector lamp.

Size is another issue, though I try as much as possible to include soe sense of the wall or floor to give viewers an idea of scale.

Chris Ashley said...

Nice coverage- like that new Mangold. The unidentified artist of the cruciform paintings at Slewe Galerie is Dutch painter Steven Aalders.

zackofalltrades said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
zackofalltrades said...

so true - I guess why it's so striking to me at this moment is because I live way the heck out in omaha-on-the-beach in the warm and shallow pit which is blandiego, so I'm generally seeing the work via my endless blogroll or in artforum years before I finally see it in person - I can't tell you how many times at basel I saw work which had been made to look excellent in photos, but which was disappointing in person for one reason or another. the same also happens in reverse, some things which I had seen online and thought "really?" were sublime in person

that wasn't meant to be ANY sort of dig at you or your excellent and extremely USEFUL blog by the way, it's just where my head is at right now - I pretty much passed the time at basel shooting the work for myself so that I could remember how it looked in person by the act of photographing it, and am now working towards something new inspired by what I saw which will hopefully look as good in person as it does in photos - I'm having a reactive moment to, for instance, certain methods of painting which look excellent in photos but which IMHO are dead feeling in life - all new information is wonderful and you're doing an excellent job as usual, keep up the good work (please) !!!

( and, oh well, I guess I'll just have to keep going to fairs to see the work in the flesh. sigh, life is hard... LOL!!! )

Susan Buret said...

Thank you for this feast. Your generosity in sharing your experience at Miami is greatly appreciated.

Richard Bottwin said...

That was indeed a feast, yummy! The Quaytman makes me sigh...
Too bad he is no longer with us.