7.11.2012

Color: Field and Form, Part 1

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Color: Field and Form is a series that will show you some of what I've seen over the past few months in New York City, and in a few instances, Boston.  I'm going to keep the text brief but provide links where appropriate. The series is planned for six parts (maybe more?)which I'll post over the next few weeks.  In this post we look at the work of Anne Truitt, Anne Appleby, Julian Jackson, Stuart Shils and Rory Donaldson. .


Anne Truitt, Drawings
Matthew Marks Gallery, February 5 - April 14
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Untitled, 1967, acrylic on paper, 27.5 x 41 inches
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This retrospective exhibition presented 40 years of Truitt's works on paper—flat color, largely monochromatic, yet with color shifts that become more apparent with sustained looking. Truitt created these "drawings"—really, paintings on paper—concurrently with her iconic minimalist sculptures. (I reported on a 2007 exhibition of the sculptures at Matthew Marks here.)
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You can see three installation views below, which I shot. The gallery has more images here and a video here.
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View from the entry . . .
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. . . swinging around clockwise, with a far-wall view of the work that opens this post  . . .
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. . . and contining around the room with the dividing wall to our left
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Anne Appleby, Paintings
Danese Gallery, February
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Faded Sweet Pea, 2008, oil and wax on panel, 33 x 33 inches
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Appleby, who divides her time between San Francisco and Montana, builds her color fields layer upon layer. In her case “field” has a literal meaning, as she sees herself a landscape painter. There is a distinct seasonal feel to the palette in her work here: spring pinks and greens, autumnal ochres, wintry grays. The photographs do not do justice to the works, since the layers of oil and wax are luminous and subtle, deepening toward the center. I suggest you seek out an exhibition of Appleby's paintings and stand before them to absorb what they have to offer.
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View the online catalog here.
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Installation view with Winter into Spring, left wall, Late Summer Aspen, far wall, and Faded Sweet Pea, right
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Julian Jackson, Crossing
Kathryn Markel Fine Arts, May 17 - June 16
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View from the entrance showing Crossing Earth, left, and Crossing Green, both 2012,  oil on canvas
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Forget that hack Kinkaid, who appropriated a title he didn't deserve. Julian Jackson is the real painter of light. Handling oil masterfully, he appears to illuminate each meditative canvas with a source that emanates from deep within. Says Jackson, “I try to bring a sense of movement and the experience of time into the stillness of abstract painting.” Done. Exquisitely.
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See more here.
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Entering and turning to the left, you see the painting below: Crossing White,  2012, oil on canvas, 54 x 54 inches
(Image below from the Kathryn Markel gallery website)
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We're now in the second gallery looking back into the first.
Below: Crossing Air, left;  Crossing Blue in the front gallery, right
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Stuart Shils, The Residue of Memory
Steven Harvey Fine Art Projects, April 26 - May 27
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Installation view with End of a Summer Day, Last Blast of Warm Light, Looking Back, 2012, oil on linen, 30 x 42 inches, shown above and below
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Drawing from landscapes in Vermont and Ireland, Shils has created a series of moody, warm-toned canvases, all easel size, in which hues merge and dissolve. Indeed, the titles provide the time and place, and even the frame of mind of the artist, like the one here.

See more here.

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Rory Donaldson, Shared Roadway Ahead
Winkleman Gallery, March 23 - April 21
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Installation view with Time Shardin, 2012
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Donaldson is a photographer whose most recent work is about as close to painting as photography can get. Manipulating the images digitally, he creates fluid, Frankenthaler-like abstractions from the urban landscape. I selected two of the most chromatically lush works to show you.
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See more here..

View in the Curatorial Project Room, which for this exhibition was an extension of Donaldson's work. The image below, Atomic: Bordeaux D'Amour, 2011, is shown on the left wall above. See more images here
(Photo from the gallery website by Etienne Frossard)
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In coming posts I'll show you Carlos Estrada-Vega, Gregory Johnston, Douglas Florian, Guy Goodwin, Harriet Korman, Fran Shalom, Charlene Von Heyl, Martha Clippinger, Fabienne Lassere, Sheila Hicks, and a fab show at Schroeder Romero with three artists working with color and form. I suspect there will be more if I can make the time.
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12 comments:

Jane Guthridge said...

Wow - some beautiful, lush color. Thanks for making my day.

Nancy Natale said...

Wonderful color! So rich, lush and inviting that I wanted to dive in and live in the work. Thank you, Joanne!

Tracey Adams said...

Wonderful choice of artists. I have always loved the work of Appleby and especially Shils. Thank you!

Kesha Bruce said...

"lush" is the perfect word!

Thanks for the pics, Joanne.

Tamar said...

A luscious array of color--from the gently glowing fields of Appleby to the quietly pulsing light in Jackson's paintings. Thanks Joanne, for revisiting these wonderful exhibits.

Patrick Jewell said...

Too bad I missed the Shils show -- don't recall seeing him work that size before. Thanks, Joanne!

Jane Davies said...

Thanks for posting! Beautiful color.

annell said...

I love them all. I have always loved Ann Truit's work... wonderful post. Thanks so much!!

bonny leibowitz said...

Yank you for this wnderful post, I enjoyed being introduced to a few new greats!

CMC said...

Oh my.. that Shils work.....Thanks, Joanne.

sarajo frieden said...

thank you for this wonderful post!

Frank hyder said...

Pure painting no gimmicks just poetry